COLLEGE SCAM – PERSECUTORS CHARGE OVER A DOZEN INCLUDING ACTRESSES AND CEOs

Famous actresses and CEOs and other persons are among a syndicate perpetrating scam in colleges and schools around Boston. The FBI told uncovered their acts. Among those arrested and facing charges are Actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin in a case of mail fraud and wire frauds accusations

Police authorities arrested Huffman in her house earlier today while. Loughlin is currently in Canada but is aware there is a warrant out for her arrest. Others arrested includes nine coaches of elite schools and 33 parents who prosecutors say paid “enormous amounts” to secure their ward’s admission into college. The persons arrested paid up to $6 million to get their wards into schools such as Yale, Stanford, Georgetown and USC.

The aim of the alleged fraud was to help student-athletes get into college as those who were recruited for athletics, not minding if they had athletic abilities or not, according to the indictment. It alleges that a third party took the ACT and SAT college entrance exams in place of those students. The documents also allege that some of the accused created fake athletic profiles for students to make them appear to be successful athletes and get them into college easily.

Agents allege that Huffman and her husband, William Macy, “made a purported charitable contribution of $15,000…to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme on behalf of her eldest daughter. Huffman later made arrangements to pursue the scheme a second time, for her younger daughter, before deciding not to do so.”

Prosecutors say parents paid an admissions consultant up to tunes of $25 million from the year 2011 to early 2019 to bribe coaches and school authorities to label their children as recruited athletes to boost their chances of getting into schools.

Most of the indictment revolves around William Rick Singer, the founder of a for-profit college counseling and preparation business known as “The Key.”

Authorities say the consulting company also bribed administrators of college entrance exams to allow a Florida man to take the tests on behalf of students or replace their answers with his.

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